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Strathmore ready for Terry Fox Run September 17

By Monique Massiah, Strathmore Standard

Cancer survivor Jim Waldron (far right) and his step-daughter Kerri Smith, took part in the Terry Fox Run on Sept 14 in memory of Walron's daughter Kim Connors. Twenty-seven community members came out to walk 3.5 km, 7 km, or 10.5 km. Far left, Emma Moore and event organizer Raylene Sedley.
MIRIAM OSTERMANN/ STRATHMORE STANDARD/ QMI AGENCY

Cancer survivor Jim Waldron (far right) and his step-daughter Kerri Smith, took part in the Terry Fox Run on Sept 14 in memory of Walron's daughter Kim Connors. Twenty-seven community members came out to walk 3.5 km, 7 km, or 10.5 km. Far left, Emma Moore and event organizer Raylene Sedley. MIRIAM OSTERMANN/ STRATHMORE STANDARD/ QMI AGENCY

Throw on those running shoes and get ready to pound some pavement this month in support of cancer research with the Strathmore Terry Fox Run. Terry Fox was an ordinary young person dealing with an extraordinary battle against cancer. Each year in September communities across the world organize Terry Fox Runs in his memory and to continue the battle against cancer, until there is a cure.

 

This year the Terry Fox Run in Strathmore will start at Kinsmen Park. Participants will gather at the amphitheatre on September 17. The run will be held from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and traditionally makes a lap of most of the town following Kinsmen Park into the north quadrant of the town, down Thomas Drive, along Wheatland Trail on park pathways and back again.

Individuals can pre-register for the event through the Terry Fox organization and they can also sign up for volunteer opportunities, explained race organizer Aia Clamp.

“This year in addition to the 5 K and 10K routes, we are going to have a 1K route later in the morning at about 10 a.m. It will be accessible for young children if they want to participate,” she said.

Why not spend part of the weekend getting some fresh air? Participants can walk, run, bike, rollerblade and use wheelchairs in the Terry Fox Run. The run is dog friendly as well. People can also go at their own pace.

“Cancer research is continuous and the support that is made through these races is what keeps cancer research alive and thriving in Canada,” said Clamp.

Terry Fox loved sports. In 1977, Fox discovered he had a tumour in his right leg. His leg was amputated six inches above the knee, but he still aspired to make his dreams come true.

Fox began his Marathon of Hope, a 5,000 kilometre cross-country run aimed at raising money for cancer awareness and research. In 1981, Fox achieved the goal of raising $1 from every Canadian to fight cancer.

Unfortunately, Fox passed away on June 28, 1981. Today Terry Fox Runs are held internationally and in May 2016 it was announced that Terry Fox Runs had raised over $715 million in support of cancer research.

Check-in on race day in Strathmore will begin at 7:30 a.m. That’s where participants can also hand in pledge forms and purchase t-shirts. Donations can also be made online. Race organizers invite everyone in Strathmore and the surrounding communities like Wheatland County, Rockyview County, Langdon and Chestermere to take part in the day.

For more information please contact info@terryfoxrun.org.