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Take a ride on a yarn bombed bike with Hope Bridges

By Monique Massiah, Strathmore Standard

Hope Bridges Society co-ordinator Wanda Reinholdt and upcycling facilitator Trish Nelson put the finishing touches on one of the yarn bombed bikes that are ready to be ridden. For only $2 riders get an hour with the bike and a helmet. The bikes will be auctioned off during the Hope Bridges Art and Wine Auction this month.

Hope Bridges Society co-ordinator Wanda Reinholdt and upcycling facilitator Trish Nelson put the finishing touches on one of the yarn bombed bikes that are ready to be ridden. For only $2 riders get an hour with the bike and a helmet. The bikes will be auctioned off during the Hope Bridges Art and Wine Auction this month.

They’re here, and for a toonie a piece you can take a ride on one of the Hope Bridges Society’s upcycled yarn bombed bikes this month.

 

For a limited time, before April 22, for $2 anyone can take a ride on one of the brightly decorated moveable art pieces. Just stop by the Hope Bridges Studio to sign up. Each bike is also waterproofed in case you’d like to take a ride in the rain.

There are two yarn bombed bikes, the first is called ‘Go With The Flow,’ and second bike has two names, the first is ‘ That Is My Hot Rod’ and ‘Keep It Spicy.’

Each bike is valued at approximately $200 and took about 80 hours of work to complete. The bikes have been upcycled and yarn bombed and turned into working pieces of art.

“Yarn bombing is the art of covering, something, or encasing something in yarn,” said Wanda Reinholdt co-ordinator for Hope Bridges Society.

“There’s many techniques that can be used to do that, it can be weaving in and out, it can be wrapping, it can be knitting pieces, or crocheting pieces to fit,” she said.

Yarn bombing can also involve weaving a single strange of yarn or, knitted streamers of yarn.

“We used all of those techniques on these bikes. We are so grateful for the Good Life Bike Shop in Calgary, where we found these treasures,” she said.

The bikes were purchased for about $85 from the unique bike shop that allows users to either create their own bikes from scratch, or purchase ready-to-go bikes.

“What’s great about Good Life is you can go in and you can find a very good bike for low cost, or you can go in and you can learn how to assemble. They have all sorts of parts, and all sorts of different bikes,” said Reinholdt.

“They are all used bikes. They basically receive bikes from the community and then make them available once they put them through their shop,” she explained.

“We became members of Good Life bike shop and we purchased these bikes. They were ready for the road. We just made them even more beautiful,” she said.

The bikes were created by 20 individuals within the community ranging from facilitators to upcycling participants and local crochet and knitters, Reinholdt explained.

Each bike is unique and beautiful in its own way.

“One of the bikes is a typical boys bike that is decorated in blues and purples. It’s ready for someone to ride,” said Reinholdt. The blue bike has two knitted bags on it and a wrack on the back for transporting goods. The red bike also has a basket on the front and a wrack to transport goods.

The naming of the bikes was a community effort. Reinholdt and Go Green Upcycling facilitator Trish Nelson led the discussions on the design of the bikes and the process of creating the bikes as a project for the annual Art and Wine Auction.

Each year, Hope Bridges Society auction’s off one of their projects at the annual art auction. This year the art piece to be auctioned will be the two yarn bombed vintage bikes.

Each individual that signs out one of the bikes is given a helmet and has the bike for one hour. The bikes will be auctioned off during the Hope Bridges 4th annual Art and Wine Auction on April 22 at 3 p.m.

For more information about Hope Bridges please visit hopebirdges.ca, or call 403-983-3640.